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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
in all the states that have recognized same-sex marriage, massachusetts, new york, et cetera. the prop 8 case affects people only in california. so if you add up the people in those other eight or nine states -- i'm not sure if that's more than california -- probably, because new york is one of them. if they were to take the prop 8 case, and as scott mentioned earlier, if they were to rule on the big question of whether there is a right to same-sex marriage and struck prop 8 down on the same broad grounds, not that the ninth circuit did but district judge vaughn walker did here in san francisco, that would be the biggest ruling of all. that would have the biggest implication of all. >> because then you would have same-sex marriage in mississippi. it seems like the least likely place to have it, but then it would be a national rule. >> the court may not be ready to take that step against a backdrop where we have nine or ten states that have recognized same-sex marriage but that still comprise a pretty small geographic and even numerical minority. and you may not be able to count californi
at oil versus natural gas in pennsylvania, ohio, new york, where a lot of these problems have popped out. the oil and gas industry folks that we talk to continue to repeat again and again, there are no records of any problems with fracking here in the state. but because they're not being tracked, because we don't know exactly what's happening, you can't make a blanket statement and say that other than we don't knowrepercussions so far. >> if i may -- >> voluntary regulations. i always ask if we had a voluntary speed limit on the highway, how fast would people drive? the question is about this monterey formation. these are beautiful rolling hills south of the salinas valley and the lockwood area. >> that's right. >> this is not an area, though, that's had a whole lot of drilling. as you've pointed out, it's not the same as other parts of the state because the geology is tricky with fault lines and things. how likely do you think it is we're going to see a boom down there versus a few people experimenting and coming up not very economically fweeasible? >> another great question. our first
of "time" magazine. john harwood of cnbc and the "new york times." doyle mcmanus of the "los angeles times" and karen tumulty of "the washington angeles times" and karen tumulty of "the washington post."
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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